(Opening up my Emotions Bottle) By: James P. Kelley
    The Jungian psychological analysis is a form of psychology that emphasizes the primary importance of the individual psyche and the personal quest for wholeness. This can be seen with abstract art. Sometimes, this art is a form of expression, sometimes it is a stress release. Other times, art is a way of life and is what makes the most sense to someone. Psychoanalysis and art have definitely had their spars and battles, especially with art critics, but they both help each other in understanding the whole of each part. I will be using the article ‘Dreaming in the Abstract’: Mondrian, Psychoanalysis, & Abstract Art in the Netherlands by Michael White of the University of York. 

     Abstract art…more importantly, Abstract Expressionism is a very important part of the art community. However, this art form has been criticized extensively and given a bad reputation in the fine arts community throughout the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The art itself is an expressive form of release for stress, anxieties, and to paint to paint. Many critics took these paintings as very psychologically disturbed and mentally ill. Artists had to defend themselves with their explanations of their art at art showcases. “The problem in Abstraction for the analyst was not one of slipping back to a more primitive state of being but of the repression of such a state in civilised society.” (White. pg. 101). Critics and analysts had to become psychologists in some sense, especially in Europe, because of the high standards they have with their works. Abstract art is either understood with the face value of the piece, or it is read into too much and loses a very simple and very easily understood idea. 

    Psychology reads into the art and sees many varying different ideas, issues, and/or mental problems that the artists portray in their art and discuss in their explanations. “…’paintings functioned as mirrors: only when one became aware of a lower, repressed qualities, would it be possible to raise above them.'” (White. Pg. 102). Psychoanalysts and critics realized that sources for art= unconscious. We have some sort of impulses in our deeper cortex’s  in our brains that are within our grasps, but not within the grasps of understanding, except to read into it as far as we can, or take it for face value…unless the person themselves explains it. 

   As seen in the image at the top of the blog, the painting is one I painted myself. That particular piece was painted after I had a tough few days of school, work, and friend problems, I needed to escape for a while and paint to express what I was feeling. My depression was in overdrive and my angst and anger took over. There is a tear in the middle of the piece to exemplify the opening of my emotions. The rest is the different kinds of emotions and expressions I have felt for a long time. The good and bad. The best of days and the worst of days. Personally, this is my best piece emotionally. 

   Abstract art in today’s society is something that is purchased to show affluence, wealth, and class. Paintings are unique and intricate pieces of work that represent a lot of hours of pouring emotions and talent to canvas/paper/wood and sometimes it is lost with just having a piece of work to hang on your wall. When you buys a piece of art, something clicks for you visually, psychologically, or emotionally for you, the audience. It speaks to you with sparking a memory, speaks to you emotionally with the vivid imagery, or nonrepresentational brush strokes that somehow become images in your head, using the visual fixing by implication to see something and either finish the piece or see it out of a mess of squiggles and swirls.

    The Jungian psychological analysis is a form of psychology that emphasizes the primary importance of the individual psyche and the personal quest for wholeness. This can be seen with abstract art. Sometimes, this art is a form of expression, sometimes it is a stress release. Other times, art is a way of life and is what makes the most sense to someone. However you see it, art and psychology have a hand in hand relationship with each other and it becomes either a beautiful thing, or a destructive force. 

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